jimstimes

Sailing my Paradox and country living

Recent sailing Part3. Failure to get up the Lynher

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After my 2 days with Geoff and was back on my little boat again, I wanted to take advantage of the big tides that were happening then and try to get as far up the River Lynher as I could at high water. I’d heard that there was a pub at a place called Notter Bridge which could be got to by a Kayak or canoe and really wanted to see if I could make it up to there in a Paradox.

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My sketch map of the Tamar and its tributary the River Lynher

So I anchored in the River Tamar between Cargreen and the Bridges and waited   The plan was set off on the last bit of the ebb to the junction of the main river and the Lynher, take the young flood up to the Dandy Hole.

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Waiting at anchor in the Tamar

While waiting, I’d discovered that a nice wholemeal loaf, one of two which had been bought the week before had grown some mould on the outside. I’d scoffed the first one already before meeting up with Geoff and was worried in case this second one was going to be a total loss…

So I scraped off the mould from the sides of the loaf – found that it was only the surface that was spoilt and then left it on the aft deck in the sunshine hoping to dry it out a bit more.This summer has been quite humid and I always struggle to keep mould from the bread and the cheese.

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The sunshine treatment worked well and I was still able to eat the bread a few days later.

Just before the tide changed I upped anchor and sailed in a very light breeze down under the 2 bridges and into the Lynher just as the flood started.

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Sailing slowly up the Lynher with the rising tide towards  the Dandy Hole.

The river all above the Dandy hole dries out completely at low tide and I had to wait there for a bit until there was enough depth to go onwards.

Went on slowly. Very little wind in the the river which is in a deep valley so mostly sculled the boat along with the tide helping progress.

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And under this railway viaduct as the rising water made progress possible

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Eventually had to take the mast down as the river became narrower and the branches of the trees lining both  banks met completely overhead.

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The mast down

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The tress meet overhead.

By this stage, the journey was getting more difficult. I was too busy fending off from the trees and rocks to take more photos. And, although the tide was still rising I’d met an increasingly strong current against me, presumably due to the abundant rainfall  that we’ve had lately.. Also the river was getting very shallow and narrow.

Eventually decided that it would be foolhardy to go any further. The ever stronger current impeded me and I repeatedly grounded in the shallows and the river was so narrow that there were only a few places where I could turn the boat round.

I quite expected to meet the African Queen being pulled along by Humphry Bogart and Katherine Wotsit at any moment.

So, common sense prevailed.  I managed to turn the boat and get back through the shallow gravelly bits to deeper water and out of the woods.

I hightailed it back to the Dandy Hole where I could anchor in deep water and only just made it before the night closed in.

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4 thoughts on “Recent sailing Part3. Failure to get up the Lynher

  1. Great trip and lovely pics. Out of interest the bits that you see of fungus on bread and anything else for that matter are the fruiting bodies. People think that by scraping that off you are removing the fungus. But to make analogy with a rose bush really you are only removing the roses. The majority of the fungi is still there. The good news is people have been eating mouldy stuff for years without any I’ll effects.
    Michael

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  2. Thanks for that re-assurance Michael. I get green mould on the cheese too and scrape most it off and I’m still alive and kicking so it can’t be too harmful, as you say.
    As for the bread, eventually it gets black mould deep inside and then I do chuck it out. Is that the right thing to do?

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  3. Thats a good question actually because there have been some recent studies comparing the amount of different bacteria living inside us with health scores and allergies etc, and it appears that those people who’re carrying more unique bacterial species may both be thinner and less likely to be susceptible to allergies(but all these health surveys have to be taken with a pinch of salt in my opinion) However if it looks nasty I wouldn’t eat it and there are some individuals who get a systemic fungal infection within their system which can make them very ill, most likely when their immune system is down, so I wouldn’t eat mouldy bread. My record for past its sell by date eating is making lovely biscuits with golden syrup that was 7 years out of date. They tasted delicious by the way. It wasn’t intentional just one of those tins that got buried at the back of the cupboard.
    Had about 4 months fixing and sailing, mostly fixing in South Holland. Great trip, boat is still there ready for part 2 next year. back home looking for jobs now, and catching up on my household chores.

    Michael

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    • You should only take the advice with a very small pinch of salt, Michael. We don’t want your blood pressure to get too high.

      Seriously, I’m glad that you had a nice time this summer, thanks for the comments and I hope you get sorted with a job OK..

      Best

      Jim

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